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Jodi asking a question at one of the Wish for WASH Professional Development webinars.

I decided to apply for Engineers Without Borders (EWB) in Spring 2020 because I wanted to gain experience working on real global development projects. To be honest, I selected Wish for WASH (W4W) because it was the only project for which I could attend the weekly meetings, but I’m so glad it’s where I ended up.

I have had a wonderful experience in W4W thus far. I am one of the only mechanical engineering students at Georgia Tech involved with the organization, so they have given me oodles of opportunities. I have primarily been doing off-grid sanitation design research with…


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Lindsey, Jodi and Jaz working on zoom as a part of the Toilet Design Research Team

I joined Wish for WASH in June of 2020. At that time, Wish for WASH’s mission to bring innovation to sanitation resonated with me having recently evacuated from Peace Corps service in Senegal, West Africa: a country where sanitation systems vary widely.

Firstly, it is important to debunk false assumptions about living standards in developing countries, so I will say that visions of primitive sanitation systems are not entirely accurate. I saw a wide array of systems ranging from standard flushing toilets to porcelain squat toilets to cement platforms with a hole in the center.


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Tanvi and the 2018 Wish for WASH Design Thinking Leadership Team during our first long term WASH-course educational pilot with the Paideia school.

As we approach the end of the year, I wanted to reflect on my time in Wish for WASH and how I’ve seen this organization grow. Given that the Wish for WASH culture has always emphasized inclusion and diverse thinking, it does not surprise to see how the size of our team has grown and that our projects now range from various sanitation research projects to design thinking education all bringing in new voices to the world of sanitation.


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To celebrate World Toilet Day 2020, Wish for WASH co-hosted a documentary film screening and Q&A on sustainable water solutions with various organizations including the Jewish National Fund and Engineers Without Borders- Georgia Tech student organization.

Sustainable Nation, the featured documentary, follows three individuals who are doing their part to bring sustainable water solutions to an increasingly thirsty planet. Using innovative solutions developed in water-scarce Israel, they are working to change the status quo of a world where one in ten people lacks access to safe drinking water. But water is just the beginning. The work of this visionary trio…


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Mariel during the 2016 SafiChoo beta pilot in Lusaka, Zambia as the Vice President of Product Development.

The journey of Wish for WASH throughout the last few years has really been rewarding both as I look at the growth of the organization and my own personal and professional development.

Since joining Wish for WASH in 2015, the organization has expanded beyond a small team of Georgia Tech Alum to include a growing group of students and then even beyond campus ties. We updated an early version of SafiChoo toilet system to address the findings of the Kenya project and the new user group for the pilot in Zambia. While on the ground in Zambia, we were prototyping…


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Sarah with some Wish for WASH team members and other Atlanta women celebrating women’s empowerment initiatives in the city

My journey to Wish for Wash started the same way that my journey to public health did. 5 years ago, I worked at an environmental nonprofit in East Tennessee. My office was at the county compost facility and landfill where I have fond memories watching the sun rise over heaps of garbage and scrap metal. That job lit my passion for sustainability and protecting the health of our planet as well as the animals and humans who live on it. …


By Katherine Isaf and Jasmine Burton of Wish for WASH

Much of our work, education, and social life has gone virtual over the past year in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. With these unwilled transitions, however, we may have discovered that virtual isn’t all bad, particularly in the conference world for work related to sustainability. From November 26–30th, more than three thousand of us attended The 11th Annual Water and Health Conference: Science, Policy, and Practice hosted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s (UNC) Water Institute and experienced the best of a well-executed conference-gone-virtual. Presentations were recorded and…


The jargon used in my conversations, research, and projects today would be most familiar to those in the world of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). They cover concerns of transboundary water governance, water security policies, irrigation efficiencies, corporate water savings, and the like. However, some three years before I had ever heard of IWRM, as an acronym or profession, I was introduced to water in the associated yet separate field of WaSH, or “Water, Sanitation and Hygiene.”

While contributing to the early stages of Wish for WASH (W4W), I learned to intensely focus on the human variable in WaSH infrastructure…


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Brandon teaching some students about the sanitation fecal to oral pathway digram (known as the F-Diagram)

It’s hard to believe that I’ve been a part of Wish For WASH for 6 years… back before we were even called Wish for WASH. I have played many roles in Wish for WASH before joining the Board of Directors. I started as an undergraduate at Georgia Tech, working on a number of projects including composting and waste management. Over the years, I have been a leader of the Georgia Tech students, an independent researcher and engineer for the toilet, overseen the implementation of our toilets, and now serving as a board member. It’s been remarkable to see this organization…


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Emma and some of the Wish for WASH team during the team’s 5 year celebration!

I began working with Wish for WASH as a grad student in the water, sanitation, and hygiene program at Emory, and I have stayed involved as I start my career in environmental health. My first project was collaborating on a literature review with hopes of publishing in a journal which can be found here. We focused on biosensors in wastewater infrastructure as a promising method for health surveillance and explored the applications, strengths, and weaknesses of this technology in the field. I was able to gain experience in the research and publication process as well as present the findings at…

Wish for WASH

Wish for WASH seeks to bring more diverse minds, talent, and innovation to the problems of global heath and WASH in our world because #everybodypoops.

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